Visit the Swedish Vasa Ship Museum of Stockholm

It was an amazing experience, to visit this one-of-a-kind maritime museum in Stockholm. In any case, Vasa museum is commonly known as the Swedish Vasamuseet. This basic yet tremendous historical centre displays a titanic Vasa ship, that couldn’t cruise a mile yet, in the end, became the pride of the country. I found out that at the pre-cruise service, firearms were shot as a salute at Stockholm port. Despite the fact that, the ship sank on her first venture in the Baltic ocean. The ship was found after three centuries and is on display in a museum now. Without a doubt, Vasa museum is a wellspring of national pride for Sweden.

Vasa Ship Museum

Wasa Shipyard held Vasa ship until 1988

Initially, Vasa ship was kept in the Stockholm harbour, thereafter, it relocated to her permanent home in Vasa Museum. Archaeologists found 500 figures from this colossal ship, which contribute an incredible arrangement to it’s building cost. The sculptures carved out of oak, pine and linden symbolise Roman and Greek relics. On the other hand, there’s Mediterranean Imagery and Dutch bizarre style parading figures of the old Egypt. Enjoy viewing the fascinating mermaids, wild men, ocean creatures and Tritons. After all, the splendid Vasa dispatch was King Gustavus’ commencement of glory.

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The Vasa Museum is the most visited Museum in Scandinavia

The Vasa Museum opened in June 1990, and today it is the most visited museum in the whole of Scandinavia. I went by Vasa Museum on 10th August 2016, precisely 388 years after the Swedish warship sank. That serendipity made my visit more unique and made me associate with this marine ruler. Vasa was no common ship! Truth be told, the ship was generously enhanced to symbolise King’s aspirations for Sweden.

Around 400 specialists worked their ship building skills on Vasa, at the Imperial shipyard of Stockholm. Adding 64 bronze guns and other capable vessels, transformed Vasa into a perilously unstable ship. Regardless, King ordered to land her in the fight, the ship staggered and sank at the first solid whiff of air.

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Gustavus Adolphus, the ‘King of Sweden’ had ordered to build Vasa

This 16th-century magnanimous ship was neither the biggest nor the one conveying the best number of firearms. So what made her the most capable warship of the time? Obviously, the joined weight of shot! At the end of the day, the shot fired from the gun on one side weighed 267 kgs. Vasa had the biggest convergence of mounted guns in a solitary warship in the Northern Europe at the time, and it was not until the 1630’s that a ship with more capability was fabricated. That once more, just 700 tonnes heavier than the first Vasa deliver.

Recovery of Artefacts and other Items from Vasa ship

In 1961, marine archaeologists recovered thousands of artefacts and remains of 15 people around Vasa’s hull. Among many items found, were clothing, cannons, tools, weapons, coins, cutlery and 6 of the 10 sails. It’s absolutely wonderful to stand there and oversee these marvellous beauties. This also made me look at the extraordinary shipbuilding techniques, employed by Swedes. The main hall of the museum exhibit 17th century Vasa and archaeological findings.

Correspondingly, Vasa has been fitted with a new bowsprit and winter rigging along with other new parts to replace the previously damaged parts. The replacement parts of Vasa were neither treated nor painted. For the same reason, they are clearly visible from the original material. The figure of Hercules depicts opposite aspects of the ancient hero. You will find them as a pair of pendants on each side of the lower galleries, one younger one older.

The ship has been a prime symbol of the Swedish power. Over 29 million visitors have visited the museum since 1961. The museum belongs to the Swedish National Maritime Museums. Another Heritage landmark in Stockholm, that should be on your travel list.

  • Veidehi, also known as Krazy Butterfly is a passionate Travel, Lifestyle and Food Blogger who loves to connect with diverse cultures and cuisines. The world is a Book, and she will unfold many unread pages for you! With that focus, her restless roaming spirit is out there taking pictures and capturing the true essence of her port of call.

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